One thing I’m very grateful for is that my parents did very different jobs, so I grew up with a good balance of left & right brain exercise.

My dad was an electrical engineer and worked for a big US computer company. My mum was an english teacher, then a college principal.

One thing I was never short of as a kid was books, and I had a decent computer ahead of all of my friends.

So, as well as copywriting and the creative end of marketing, I was always drawn to all the data end of it as well.

That’s how I ended up in direct response marketing and not just advertising.

The greatest marketing mentors I ever had were on top of two things.

What the market wanted, and their response numbers.

They knew the response rates of every list, every ad, every catalogue, every sales letter, and they tested relentlessly.

I’m going to talk a bit more about tools and data than most marketing emails because, frankly, it’s 2022 and you need them to function if you’re going to run campaigns yourself.

Being great at copy is good as an employee or freelancer, but if you want to own the whole pie, you need to be able to get the whole engine running.

My design skills aren’t that great so one tool I use a lot is Feng Gui.

It’s a tool that does simulated eye-tracking. Basically a cheap way of seeing where your focus goes on an advert or a web page.

This is theĀ one I ran on the attention hooks guide.

What you want is a focus on the product, the headline and then on the form.

I can see that the little red text gets too much attention so I’ll be dropping it (It was part of the book cover template. Not sure why I used it really.)

You should still test changes if you can, but this will give you a better idea of what to test if your reader isn’t drawn to the right things.

(It’s not 100% accurate, whilst I know that people focus on eyes in real tests, there’s other parts of that page that would get more attention than the blue button 🙈) 

If you didn’t get the guide yet, you can still get it here.