WordPress Magazine Themes – Hot for 2008

2007 saw the art of blogging really hit the mainstream, to the extent that traditional and ‘respectable’ journalists started to sit up, take notice, whinge, and then head back to their boozy lunches to make up a few more half truths about Paris Hilton. The medium really started to evolve, and the widget-heavy personal blogs […]

2007 saw the art of blogging really hit the mainstream, to the extent that traditional and ‘respectable’ journalists started to sit up, take notice, whinge, and then head back to their boozy lunches to make up a few more half truths about Paris Hilton.

The medium really started to evolve, and the widget-heavy personal blogs of 2006 started to evolve into something much more like  professional media properties.

As this happens, the look of some of the major bloggers blogs had a big overhaul with the likes of John Chow, and  Problogger getting a new look.

The main characteristics  of the new ‘magazine’ style are as follows:

  1. Abandoning the full post on the front page, and giving many more links to different content so new users can get a taste of the full flavour of the site
  2. Obvious spaces to monetise the blog using advertising
  3. Really pushing the RSS and email subscription options

Quick to react, a number of these themes became available from commercial designers, of which my favourites are:

The Revolution Series of themes by Brian Gardner (paid)

Your Revolution (paid)

Block Magazine (paid)

The Morning After (free)

The new design of this blog is a  heavily customised version of the last one.

If you want to raise the profile of your blog in 2008, and start to monetise it better,  this might be a design route worth investigating.

Discover 5 email campaigns you can set and forget

Make sure your leads aren't falling through the cracks.
Keep them engaged with these 5 simple email series.

Discover the tools I use to build scalable funnels in  a day